Coronavirus Patients Twice As Likely To Have Eaten In Restaurants Before Getting Ill – CDC Study

CDC study Coronavirus Patients Twice As Likely To Have Eaten In Restaurants Before Getting Ill
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A new study has found that those who tested positive for COVID-19 were twice as likely to have dined at a restaurant in the 14 days before falling ill.

A new CDC study shows that eating out at restaurants is a risky proposition for contracting COVID-19. The study found that both positive and negative cases reported going to gyms, hair salons, shops and in-home group gatherings at about the same rate. But the positive cases were about twice as likely to report dining out at restaurants within the 14-day period before feeling sick. Seventy-one percent of people who tested positive said they had always worn face coverings in public, compared with 74% of the control group.

However, take-out doesn’t appear to increase risk for contracting the virus since COVID-19 isn’t a food-borne disease…even for cold foods like salad and sushi. So – you probably want to skip the dine-in experience for the time being, and get your order to-go to satisfy that craving for enchiladas.

NEWSWEEK: Coronavirus Patients Twice As Likely To Have Eaten In Restaurants Before Getting Ill: CDC Study

NPR: Adults With COVID-19 Twice As Likely To Have Eaten At Restaurants, CDC Study Finds

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